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  • Philippine Council for Health Research and Development Articles Philippine Council for  Health Research and Development Articles Beware of the mosquito with white stripes on its legsThe doubtful dieterYou can live to age 120How a pimple ...
    Posted Oct 8, 2013, 2:54 AM by Michael Dinglasan
  • PFV, PIDSP & ISTP join CoMO in celebrating WMD 2012 PFV, PIDSP and ISTP celebrate World Meningitis Day 2012 with CoMO.For the schedule of activities and pictures from the event, please click the link below: "CoMO report.pdf".
    Posted Jul 31, 2012, 7:21 AM by Michael Dinglasan
  • CoMo WMD Results report Members June 2012 "Join Hands Against Meningitis" - World Meningitis Day Report.Please click the link below ("CoMO WMD Results Report Members.pdf") for the full report.
    Posted Jul 31, 2012, 7:23 AM by Michael Dinglasan
  • The Future of Vaccine Safety Amidst the breathtaking sights of Antipolo City and the equally engaging smiles of the staff of the Eugenio Lopez Center, medical professionals and other allied fields held a meeting of ...
    Posted Jul 31, 2012, 3:18 AM by Michael Dinglasan
  • Vaccine Advocacy: Mission NOT Impossible by Dr. Carina M. Frago for the Philippine Foundation for Vaccination  “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” This adage could not have been more apt when ...
    Posted Jul 31, 2012, 2:30 AM by Michael Dinglasan
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Philippine Council for Health Research and Development Articles

posted Oct 8, 2013, 2:54 AM by Michael Dinglasan   [ updated Oct 8, 2013, 2:54 AM ]

PFV, PIDSP & ISTP join CoMO in celebrating WMD 2012

posted Jul 31, 2012, 4:24 AM by Michael Dinglasan   [ updated Jul 31, 2012, 7:21 AM ]

PFV, PIDSP and ISTP celebrate World Meningitis Day 2012 with CoMO.

For the schedule of activities and pictures from the event, please click the link below: "CoMO report.pdf".

CoMo WMD Results report Members June 2012

posted Jul 31, 2012, 3:35 AM by Michael Dinglasan   [ updated Jul 31, 2012, 7:23 AM ]

"Join Hands Against Meningitis" - World Meningitis Day Report.

Please click the link below ("CoMO WMD Results Report Members.pdf") for the full report.

The Future of Vaccine Safety

posted Jul 31, 2012, 3:18 AM by Michael Dinglasan   [ updated Jul 31, 2012, 3:18 AM ]

Amidst the breathtaking sights of Antipolo City and the equally engaging smiles of the staff of the Eugenio Lopez Center, medical professionals and other allied fields held a meeting of minds for the Philippine Foundation for Vaccination ( PFV ) seminar/workshop, the first of its kind in the Philippines, sponsored by three pharmaceutical companies, Aventis Pasteur, GlaxoSmithKline and Marketlink.
The two-day seminar/workshop, bannered Vaccine Safety: Philippines 2003, proved to be a fruitful endeavor for doctors, nurses and pharmacists alike and provided a venue for exchange of ideas and knowledge in pressing matters concerning immunization.

The affair, which kicked off August 7,2003 tackled a myriad of topics, from pharmacovigilance, vaccine safety, to the creation of a Philippine system for reporting and surveillance, discussed by a number of prestigious and accomplished speakers in their fields coming from as far as France.

PFV President Dr. Lulu Bravo, opened the affair. First stop for the morning lectures was Dr. Elizabeth Loupi, who came all the way from France for a lecture on "Introduction to Immunization Safety and Pharmacovigilance" which was followed by an open forum facilitated by Dr. Anna Lisa Ong-Lim.
Dr. Loupi, the director for pharmacovigilance, training and compliance of Aventis Pasteur gave an interesting talk, which traced the history of pharmacovigilance and gave a background on immunization safety.

No less than Dr. Kenneth Hartigan Go shared his views on "The Similarities and Differences between Vaccines and Medicines."

He stressed that like medicines, vaccines may also cause adverse effects, and discussed the techniques for dealing with these effects. Dr. Cecilia S. Montalban acted facilitator and reactor during the open forum, which followed.

With the foundation for the understanding on Adverse Effects Following Immunization ( AEFI ) laid, it was high time to learn how to deal with these effects. Dr. Agnes B. Benegas of the NEC shared her expertise on the topic "Basic Principles of Surveillance," and gave listeners the background on how the existing surveillance system for AEFIs work. Dr. Benegas readily answered the questions of the audience which paved the way for a lively discussion with Dr. Nancy Bermal acting as facilitator.

[ Dr. Kenneth Hartigan Go spoke on "Understanding Vaccine Reactions" and the management of these reactions. He also shed light on the different kinds of AEFIs and the criteria for reporting these events. ]


After the hearty lunch, the participants were back to work in no time at all for the afternoon sessions with Dr. Alice B. Tamesis as chair for the rest of the afternoon and Dr. Anna Lisa Ong-Lim as rapporteur..

[ Dr. Salvacion R. Gatchalian gave her views on "Prevention and Management," which tackled different adverse reactions associated with specific vaccines and the management of these reactions. An open forum followed with Dr. Remedios F. Coronel as facilitator/reactor. ]

A question and answer portion followed, with Dr. Geraldine Crimen from the Department of Health as facilitator.
Dr. Eric A. Tayag discussed "Investigating AEFI: Basic Principles of Case Investigation". Participants later grouped themselves into five and brainstormed for the workshop given by Dr. Tayag. Each group was given their own case studies to discuss. The results were presented and analyzed. This was followed by Dr. Shelley Ann Dela Vega's lecture on "Introduction to Casuality Assessment".

The group then took a break and enjoyed the sumptuous dinner. The PFV officers held a business meeting to discuss the day's accomplishments and to prepare for the next day's agenda.

Participants then breathed in the sights of cool Antipolo with the lights of Manila flitting like fireflies.

The next day arrived with a drizzle and the overlooking view now obscured by the fog. This did not serve to dampen their spirits. Day Two proved to be an even more exciting day.
Dr. Kenneth Hartigan Go started the ball rolling as chair for the morning sessions. First on the list was a lecture on "Risk Benefit Analysis/Cost benefit delivered by Ms. Marissa Macaraeg-Laureta. Facilitating the discussion afterwards was Dr. Cynthia Santos-Ocampo Padilla.

Down the line, Drs. Teresita B. Sanchez and Alice B. Tamesis discussed the "Legal and Ethical Responsibilities of the EPI Program Managers" and the liabilities of those administering vaccines and how to deal with cases of AEFI events in legal aspects. An interesting and informative discussion followed, with Dr. Sanchez addressing questions from participants regarding legalities in the profession.

After lunch, the afternoon sessions were opened with Dr. Salvacion R. Gatchalian as chair.

Dr. Kenneth Hartigan Go gave his views on "Communicating with Parents/Health Workers/Media" which was highlighted by the role-playing participated by chosen attendees acting out their part with much gusto. The audience discussed whether the manner of communicating with the respective persons involved really worked. Dr. go stressed the importance of media, not only in the advocacy campaign for vaccination but also in the great role they play in improving the relationship of the public and the medical community.

Participants and organizers agreed that there is a great need for a Philippine system for surveillance of AEFIs. This was exactly what Dr. Alvin Marcelo did when he gave his presentation on "Creating the Philippine System for AEFI Training, Reporting and Surveillance" along with Drs. Go and Tayag to cap the event. Dr. Marcelo talked on the technological aspects of creating the Philippine System, which will start with the Alerting System through SMS ( Short Messaging System ), or text messaging to give reporters easy access to alert authorities about an AEFI.
At the end of the seminar, both participants and organizers agreed that there is still much to learn about Vaccine Safety and the Management of AEFIs. It was decided that education is the key to all these, which will involve vaccine safety training for regional authorities, medical societies, local government officials and even the media as key participants.

The workshop was a very fruitful endeavor indeed, and we can look forward to a Vaccine Safe Philippines, thanks to PFV.

Vaccine Advocacy: Mission NOT Impossible

posted Jul 31, 2012, 2:30 AM by Michael Dinglasan   [ updated Jul 31, 2012, 2:30 AM ]

by Dr. Carina M. Frago for the Philippine Foundation for Vaccination

  “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” This adage could not have been more apt when it comes to vaccines. Globally, 12 million children less than five years of age die annually from vaccine-preventable diseases. Without immunization programs worldwide, the death toll could be higher: 2.7 million are expected to die from measles, 1.2 million from tetanus, 10,000 from diphtheria and 800,000 from polio. Data from the National Statistics Office and UNICEF showed that 35 out of 1,000 Filipino infants die annually from vaccine-preventable diseases such as measles, tetanus, pertussis, hepatitis and meningitis. The launching of the Expanded Program of Immunization (EPI) by the World Health Organization (WHO) in the 60’s caused a significant decrease in disability and death from these diseases. Thanks to the government support and implementation of the EPI, compulsory basic immunization is provided by the local health centers. As the number of fully immunized children increased to about 80 to 90%, the infant mortality rate subsequently declined.

  Despite these encouraging results, the Philippines has a long way to go in terms of achieving a fully immunized population. Essentially, limited resources pose problems in implementing a successful immunization program. While the EPI dramatically improved the health situation, it only covers BCG (for tuberculosis), DPT (diphteria, pertussis and tetanus), measles and hepatitis B.
  
 
It does not include vaccines against other potentially deadly diseases such as HiB vaccine for Haemophilus influenza type b, MMR for measles, mumps and rubella, varicella vaccine for chicken pox, flu vaccine for influenza, pneumococcal vaccine for Strep. pneumoniae, rotavirus vaccine for rotavirus diarrhea, meningococcal vaccine for N. meningitides, hepatitis A, and typhoid. Although most of these diseases are generally self-limiting, complications do occur after natural infection. Mumps may cause viral encephalitis (a form of brain infection) and sterility in males. Rubella also known as german measles results in congenital defects of the unborn baby or even abortion if a pregnant mother gets infected. Rotavirus is the most common cause of diarrhea which may cause death if complications of dehydration arise. Hepatitis A is a significant cause of death and morbidity especially among adults but the vaccine is recommended to be given as early as 1-2 years of age. Pneumococcal and Hib vaccines prevent serious infections like meningitis (brain infection) and pneumonia. Sadly, only the middle to upper income groups are able to afford and, thus, avail of these equally important vaccines.

Lastly, most parents are unaware of or misinformed about vaccines in general resulting in missed vaccine schedules. They should be educated about the importance of immunization so that it will be among their list of priorities. Also, it is never too late to complete one’s vaccine schedule. It should be emphasized that, contrary to popular belief, vaccines are not limited to children.

Adolescents and adults also need to be immunized. For instance, the population most susceptible to hepatitis B, a fatal disease associated with liver cancer, are those engaged in increased sexual activity and injecting drug use, health care workers exposed to blood and patients undergoing dialysis. Chicken pox may cause severe complications such as encephalitis if a person gets infected after 15 years of age. Pregnant women need a booster dose of anti-tetanus vaccine since maternal tetanus is responsible for at least 5% of all maternal deaths. The elderly group (60 years old and above) are also more susceptible to flu and pneumonia thus necessitating flu and Strep. pneumoniae vaccines.

No doubt about it, the entire population would benefit from vaccination. Fortunately, a fully immunized nation is an attainable goal but it will take the combined efforts of the health care workers, government, legislators, non-government organizations and the media. Thus, the Philippine Foundation for Vaccination, Inc. (PFV) ---a non-stock, non-profit organization which aims to protect and advocate for the promotion of vaccination as essential to disease prevention, was established in 2000. To fulfill its goals, the foundation works closely with government health care agencies, non-government organizations, and other relevant institutions in disseminating information and updates on immunization.

One of PFV’s achievements is organizing an annual national immunization conference participated in by medical and paramedical health care workers, health maintenance personnel, media and other socio-civic organizations. Aside from developing and updating a recommended schedule of immunization for Filipinos, it also conducts vaccine missions in schools and universities. In addition, it is instrumental in initiating resolutions and proposals for the possible legislation of mandatory hepatitis B vaccination of infants within 24 hours of birth and complete immunization as a prerequisite for school and job entrants.

 This year, to further encourage vaccine advocacy, PFV is holding a contest on Best Immunization Practices in the Workplace/Community.This contest is open to any school, organization and institution dedicated to the promotion of vaccination.

Meningitis Awareness Campaign

posted Jul 31, 2012, 2:05 AM by Michael Dinglasan   [ updated Jul 31, 2012, 5:26 AM ]

(Manila) A child develops cough colds and fever and within a few days he has a seizure, goes into a comatose state and never regains a normal mental state again. The family spends all their savings and even mortgage their house to continue his treatment but to no avail. The child dies after one year with the family deep in debts. This is a true story that is happening everyday not only in the Philippines but all over the world. Some who are not treated and brought to hospitals die within a few days to several weeks. Many of those who survive are disabled and taken care of by the family members for life. Lucky are the survivors without any handicaps. 

The Philippine Foundation for Vaccination (PFV) led by its president Dr Eric Tayag, announces the holding of World Meningitis Day on April 25 to increase awareness on the devastation and death that this illness brings to children and adults alike. Meningitis kills and disables millions of people yearly and causes hearing loss, blindness, and loss of other normal body functions. The burden of disease is huge but there is an opportunity to prevent and control its many poor outcomes.

The PFV is out to advocate giving attention to protecting families from suffering from this disease brought about by several microorganisms such as TB, Hemophilus influenza type B or HiB, Invasive Pneumococcal Disease or IPD and Meningococcal Disease. Early recognition of the disease can lead to treatment and better survival and outcome. Everyone must be aware of its symptoms. However, vaccination is still the most effective way to prevent the disease and save millions of children and adults from its cruel consequences.

A motorcade will be held at the Fort in Taguig on April 25 starting at 6 AM to be followed by visits of doctors and vaccine advocates in various municipalities including Taguig, Makati, Marikina and Las Pinas. They will participate in giving vaccines to the people in the communities and give lectures to inform the public about the disease and its prevention. Those interested to participate can inquire at the PFV office tel. no. 5672397 and ask for Gemma Asistin. 

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